Articles By Luis Preto

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Frederico Martins
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Articles By Luis Preto

Post by Frederico Martins » Thu May 13, 2010 2:03 am

Hi everyone, I will be posting here the articles that Luis Preto is developing, hope you like it and feel free to comment!

Article 1:
Finding the right sequencing of learning Martial Art’s techniques

Article 2:
Developing the strikes' action under task oriented practice scenarios
(warning: very nice images and video examples)

Article 3:
Principals for technical development exercises

Article 4:
Martial Arts and Combat Sports: Distinguishing between the two and coming full circle

Article 5:
An alternative concept of technique
Frederico Martins
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Re: Articles By Luis Preto

Post by Frederico Martins » Wed Jul 07, 2010 2:18 pm

Article 6:
An alternative view on Lusitan Fencing’s origin
and the helpful role that it can play in the revival of medieval fencing systems.

A new article (and a bump to the thread, let me know if it is annoying this way:p)
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Roger N
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Re: Articles By Luis Preto

Post by Roger N » Thu Jul 08, 2010 9:13 am

Good stuff, all of this! :)

In relation to the sixth article, you might find the Google maps I created, linked in the thread about "Fencing masters, the Hansa and the Teutons", interesting. You and I have talked about it before, shortly. viewtopic.php?f=44&t=282

The Suebi tribe that Tacitus wrote about, lived at the mouth of Elbe, travelled south to the south of Germany, where Schwabia is named after them today, and later South-West to the north of Portugal where JdP stems from. It is a bit early, from about 76-450AD, but quite possibly the fencing traditions we all study may have old roots going back both to the various Scandinavian and Germanic tribes, some to the Eastern European tribes, and some to the Roman Empire. In all likelyhood, it has all been mixed and have influenced each other through history.
Roger Norling

Quarterstaff instructor
Gothenburg Free Fencers Guild

Member of MFFG
http://www.freifechter.com

Member of HEMAC
http://www.hemac.org

Chief editor HROARR
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Frederico Martins
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Re: Articles By Luis Preto

Post by Frederico Martins » Fri Jul 09, 2010 12:36 am

Completely agree Roger, I don't think culture just resets and fighting with similar weapons has been in Europe a necessity for war and self defense/survival for millenniums. There sure was always a communication between generations and classes, directly with teaching or just observation.

The challange is to keep this alive today when we don't need this anymore.
It kept alive in Portugal until the XX century due to need, in a rural culture that didn't have money or the possibility to have fire weapons, not even swords, but now that there is no reason for it to exists, it is a great challenge to keep it alive in proper terms and not just in a residual cultural note.

It is great to see the development of workshops around here by our masters, they are doing lots of seminars of the baton for martial artists of other arts, spetially focused on self defense, they respect what jogo do pau teaches for the baton as a effective technique and not just as a cultural thing. And the staff starts to make less and less sense to practice in this society and as much as I like it I see it as more of a strugle to keep it alive than the baton, that will surely endure due to it's usefulness even in nowadays, being a technique that has proven to be very effective.

On the other hand, what I think makes jogo do pau efficient and valuable is definitely kept in the baton, even with it's technical limitations, that make you lose some possibilities that you can do in the staff. But it is that same principles and combat heritage that is still useful and is surviving in the community today and not only as a fun activity for ludic and cultural reasons. That was required 2000 years ago for combat with similar weapons and still is today.

hope i've made sense.
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Re: Articles By Luis Preto

Post by Roger N » Wed Jul 14, 2010 6:54 pm

A bit short on time, but here are a few links that might interest you as well, about the Flemish Goedendag. :)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Goedendag

http://www.liebaart.org/goeden_e.htm

http://www.armor.com/custom935.html

I am gonna buy me one soon, I hope, after a Katzbalger and an Albion Meyer and a sparring Pollax and... ;)
Roger Norling

Quarterstaff instructor
Gothenburg Free Fencers Guild

Member of MFFG
http://www.freifechter.com

Member of HEMAC
http://www.hemac.org

Chief editor HROARR
http://www.hroarr.com
Frederico Martins
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Re: Articles By Luis Preto

Post by Frederico Martins » Fri Jul 16, 2010 2:25 pm

What a great weapon:)
cheap and effective, and defeated the expensively armored knights.

love the fact that it is heavier on the hitting extremity.

it seems quite heavy, the one for sale, would be great to try it out!
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Re: Articles By Luis Preto

Post by Roger N » Sat Jul 17, 2010 9:04 am

Unfortunately the A&A version is ridiculously expensive at 480 USD not including customs and shipping,which probably amounts to 150-200USD more. Insane, but related to custom work.

On the other hand, By The Sword Inc has a fairly good one coming in at 135USD: http://www.by-the-sword.com/acatalog/Go ... D-320.html

It's not an accurate reproduction, as far as I can tell, but the characteristics are probably fairly similar. I have also contacted a czech swordsmith that may be able to construct one at a fair price. OR we will make something ourselves. Still wish we could import more JdP staffs somehow. It would be cool to add a Goedendag-head to a JdP-staff...

Btw, I think I heard it mentioned somewhere, that in the Renaissance, some JdP-staffs had small spikes at the end. I know some quarterstaffs did. Do you know anything about this?
Roger Norling

Quarterstaff instructor
Gothenburg Free Fencers Guild

Member of MFFG
http://www.freifechter.com

Member of HEMAC
http://www.hemac.org

Chief editor HROARR
http://www.hroarr.com
Frederico Martins
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Is on speaking terms
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Joined: Thu Nov 26, 2009 10:28 pm

Re: Articles By Luis Preto

Post by Frederico Martins » Mon Jul 19, 2010 3:28 pm

that is really expensive, specially taking in consideration that if you fully use it, it will eventually and inevitably break, in about less than a year...its wood.
I will talk with Luis about shipping jdp staffs, don't know if he has time now since he is going to Germany to give a seminar there, but that would be a good thing to do.

other than Luis mentioned it in the website jogodopauportugues.com/program ,ive seen other people talking about staffs with spikes, if I find it mentioned in any written place, probably in Portuguese, I will let you know ;)
Frederico Martins
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Re: Articles By Luis Preto

Post by Frederico Martins » Mon Sep 13, 2010 1:04 pm

Hi everyone, here are some new articles:

Article 7:
A cultural and technical look at Baton Combat Systems

Article 8:
Principals for the creation of an Art’s Technique


also, Luis just started a new website where he will be posting more general articles on training science and martial arts:
Main Principles of Training Organization

hope you like it!
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