Tag: Jogo do Pau

From WHAT to teach to HOW to teach: A coaching contribution for the HEMA of the XXI century

Tactical intelligence tends to be made out to be more complex than it actually is, by being seen as weapon specific. Furthermore, it also tends to lack specific and straight forward training guidelines … which has tactical skill being frequently cast aside as a natural ability that one either has or hasn’t. As you can easily get, I don’t share this view. I view tactical training as mostly non weapon specific (through universal combat concepts such as distance, reaction time, strikes’ angles, reach, etc) and, additionally, as something that can be systematically trained in an effective manner by relying on very specific guidelines. Ultimately, this might be seen as a body of knowledge that embodies a kind of fencing mixed martial arts approach if you will. This is my stance, and the latest DVD I’ve released focuses on just that, presenting many guidelines geared towards shedding a better understanding of the: Nuts and bolts of combatants’ tactical tools, Decision making process that oversees their usage.   This overall summary mostly suffices for pragmatic sparring (output) oriented trainees and instructors who are looking for a short-cut to 15 plus years of brainstorming on my part, meant to provide an informational edge in training so as to achieve improved sparring skill. However, if you are interested in learning more concerning what brought about this project, its historical ties with HEMA and its contents, do continue reading. JdP & HEMA: A difference in focus...

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Skalastet – Sami quarterstaff & spear fighting tradition in Northern Sweden

Little is known of any indigenous martial arts traditions of Scandinavia, and while the Icelandic tales, Konungs Skuggsjá and Olaus Magnus give us some clues and Glima still remains both in its modern sport form and, to a lesser degree, in its older combat form, very little else can be found that doesn’t find its roots in Germanic, Italian, French or Asian traditions. However, just going back about 180 years we find a still living staff fighting tradition in the North of Sweden, among the Sami, called “Skalastet“. Below are two stories told by the priest Petrus Laestadius who served as a missionary  in...

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Physical conditioning, health & sport readiness

Humans attempt to make sense of their environment results, quite often, in the systematization of knowledge into boxes commonly (and quite wrongly) made out to be independent, as is the case with the existence of sport specific coaches, physical conditioning trainers, etc. However, by looking closely at physical conditioning, one must question him or herself about its purpose. In this regard, and as clearly pointed out by Kurz, sports training should be very objective and, thus, only include drills that either: Improve sport specific performance Help prevent the chances of each sport’s most common injuries. As such, these should be physical conditioning’s overall goals which, translated into actual training goals, entail gearing physical conditioning so as to maximize sport specific motor skills … which, some years ago, brought about the concept of functional training. Additionally, it is crucial for folks to start realizing that the myth of sports technique being, at the same time, the most effective and efficient motor patterns available is quite false. Instead, time constrained techniques mostly focus on effectiveness and they do so to a point that they actually entail a greater physical exertion which, in turn, requires a greater development of performers’ physical abilities. In the absence of such crucial supporting pillars trainees who only focus on sport specific training without adapting their technique so as to match their movement potential actually incur in...

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New: 2nd edition of Luis Preto’s book on Jogo do Pau!

Looking for something good to read about a living form of traditional European Martial Arts? Well here’s a good tip for you: Luis Preto is just releasing his 2nd edition of his first book on Portuguese staff fencing Jogo do Pau. It has been revised based on all the things Luis has learned since he first wrote this book eight years ago and it has lots of good, new material. Personally, I find it invaluable to study this, if you are a student of Meyer, but all fencers can find useful things in this book. To make it even more fun, there is even a 25% discount valid until Feb 28th, so go have a look: More info at http://jogodopau.blogspot.no/ Buy it at: https://www.createspace.com/4045951 It will also very soon be available on...

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Spinning around Hollywood Style?

Never ever turn your back against your opponent sounds like a good, solid advice, but is it always so? What do you do for instance, when you face multiple opponents? This article will give a few examples of Renaissance sources that touch upon this topic. In almost every movie fight involving swords there is a certain sequence that involves a pirouette, where the hero spins around, temporarily turning his back on his adversary, before striking in. It looks cool and flashy, but is commonly disregarded by HEMA fencers as being “unmartial” and ridiculous. It is something Kung Fu monks...

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